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Muslim Celebrations

By December 27, 2022Uncategorized

In Islam, there are only three special occasions or celebrations, and all three are related to acts of worship and devotion. We are therefore instructed not to participate in the religious celebrations of other traditions and faiths. Any religious celebrations that non-Muslims have are not days of celebration for Muslims. Therefore, Muslims do not celebrate or partake in Christmas, Easter, Diwali or Passover.

The three celebrations in Islam with each one marking acts of worship are:

Jumuah – Day of Assembly and Congregation

  • A weekly day of celebration on Friday
  • Muslims celebrate being able to worship God and successfully performing the daily duties of the five prescribed ritual devotions for the whole week.
  • A number of etiquettes are connected to this day, such as bathing, wearing clean clothes, and reciting chapter 18 from the Quran.
  • Able men must attend the weekly congregational service which includes a sermon before the prayer.
  • Women may attend this service, but it is not a requirement for them or an obligation to do so.
  • This is a day of extra reward for good deeds. Reciting the Quran, mentioning God and doing other good deeds will provide multiplied reward. The time between Asr, the late afternoon prayer, and Maghrib, post sunset prayer, is a virtuous time for supplications, wherein they are more likely to be answered.

 

Eid al-Fitr – The Celebration of Breaking Fast

  • Occurs once a year, at the end of the month of Ramadan, on the first day of the tenth month of the Islamic lunar calendar
  • Lasts for one day
  • Muslims celebrate the accomplishment of having fasted for a whole month and worshipped God in other ways
  • A number of etiquettes are connected to this day, such as bathing, wearing clean clothes, and not fasting.
  • The day begins with audible glorification and praise of God, then a communal congregational prayer, followed by a sermon.
  • Women and children are encouraged to participate in the communal congregation and to be a part of the prayer service.
  • It is a day of thanking God and showing happiness and joy.
  • Prior to the congregational service on the morning of the holiday, the head of every household is required to give a charity gift of staple foods to those less fortunate from the community to allow them to partake in the festivities on this occasion.

 

Eid al-Adha – The Celebration of Ritual Sacrifice

  • Occurs once a year, in the last month of the Islamic lunar calendar, specifically on the 10th of the month
  • Lasts for four days
  • Muslims celebrate the acts of worship they performed in the previous ten days, known as the Best Days of the Year.
  • Several etiquettes are connected to this day, such as bathing, wearing clean clothes, and not fasting.
  • The day begins with glorification and praise of God, then a communal congregational prayer, followed by a sermon.
  • Women and children are encouraged to participate in the communal congregation and to be part of the prayer service.
  • It is a day of thanking God and showing happiness and joy.
  • It is recommended for financially able Muslims to offer a ritual animal sacrifice on this day after the communal congregation. The time of offering this sacrifice extends to the following three days.

 

Conclusion

Islam teaches us to have our own identity in all aspects of life. This exceptional identity includes religious celebrations. The messenger Muhammad taught us through his life and example how to stand out and not to follow the ways of others. There is an Islamic exceptionalism when it comes to religious celebrations. We are taught to maintain that exceptionalism and not to lose ourselves by resisting assimilation.

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Hilma filemon
Hilma filemon
1 month ago

Jazzak Allahu khair

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